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E-waste is a popular, informal name for electronic products nearing the end of their "useful life." Computers, televisions, VCRs, stereos, copiers, and fax machines are common electronic products. Many of these products can be reused, refurbished, or recycled.

With the passage of the Electronic Waste Recycling Act of 2003, certain portions of the electronic waste stream are defined and the systems to recover and recycle them will be administratively regulated beyond the universal waste rules that apply to material handling.

E-FAQs
Is "e-waste" clearly defined?
The term "e-waste" is loosely applied to consumer and business electronic equipment that is near or at the end of its useful life. There is no clear definition for e-waste; for instance whether or not items like microwave ovens and other similar "appliances" should be grouped into the category has not been established.

Is "e-waste" considered hazardous?
Certain components of some electronic products contain materials that render them hazardous, depending on their condition and density. For instance, California law currently views nonfunctioning CRTs (cathode ray tubes) from televisions and monitor as hazardous.

What should I do with my electronic discards?
The mantra of " Reduce, Reuse, Recycle " applies here.

Reduce your generation of e-waste through smart procurement and good maintenance.
Reuse still functioning electronic equipment by donating or selling it to someone who can still use it.
Recycle those products that cannot be repaired. To find an organization that will manage your electronics for recycling

 

 

 

Lakewood

The Lakewood area includes some of Dallas’ most architecturally significant and popular neighborhoods like Caruth Terrace, Hillside, Lakewood, Lakewood Heights, Lakewood Hills, Lakewood Trails, Ridgewood Park, University Meadows, University Terrace and Wilshire Heights.

Zip code:  75214

Lakewood/ East Dallas

The Lakewood/East Dallas area includes over 30 popular and historic neighborhoods including Abrams, Belmont, Belmont Addition, Bryan Place, Caruth Terrace, Casa Linda, Casa Linda Estates, Cochran Heights, Forest Hills, Greenland Hills, Hillside, Hollywood Heights, Hollywood Santa Monica, Junius Heights, Lake Park Estates, Lakewood, Lakewood Heights, Lakewood Hills, Lakewood Trails, Little Forest Hills, Lochwood, Lower Greenville, M Streets, Munger Place, Old East Dallas, Old Lake Highlands, Ridgewood Park, Santa Monica, Swiss Avenue, University Meadows, University Terrace, Vickery Meadows, Vickery Place and Wilshire Heights.

Zip code: 75204 75206  75214 75218  75226 75246

East Dallas

The East Dallas area includes many of the following architecturally significant and historic neighborhoods: Abrams, Belmont, Belmont Addition, Bryan Place, Caruth Terrace, Casa Linda, Casa Linda Estates, Cochran Heights, Forest Hills, Greenland Hills, Hillside, Hollywood Heights, Hollywood Santa Monica, Junius Heights, Lake Park Estates, Lakewood, Lakewood Heights, Lakewood Hills, Lakewood Trails, Little Forest Hills, Lochwood, Lower Greenville, M Streets, Munger Place, Old East Dallas, Old Lake Highlands, Ridgewood Park, Santa Monica, Swiss Avenue, University Meadows, University Terrace, Vickery Meadows, Vickery Place and Wilshire Heights.

Zip code: 75204 75206  75214 75218  75226 75246

M Streets

The M Streets area of Dallas includes some of the following historic and architecturally significant neighborhoods surrounding Greenville Avenue like Belmont, Belmont Addition, Cochran Heights, Greenland Hills, Lower Greenville, M Streets, Vickery Meadows and Vickery Place

Zip code: 75206

Casa Linda/Casa View

The Casa Linda/ Casa View area is just east of White Rock Lake and includes some of the following neighborhoods: Casa Linda, Casa Linda Estates, Forest Hills, Lake Park Estates, Little Forest Hills, Lochwood, and Old Lake Highlands.

Zip codes: 75218  75228

White Rock Lake

The White Rock Lake area includes popular neighborhoods surrounding beautiful White Rock Lake like  Caruth Terrace, Casa Linda, Casa Linda Estates, Forest Hills, Hillside, Hollywood Heights, Hollywood Santa Monica, Lake Park Estates, Lakewood, Lakewood Heights, Lakewood Hills, Lakewood Trails, Little Forest Hills, Lochwood, Old Lake Highlands, Ridgewood Park, Santa Monica, University Meadows, University Terrace, and Wilshire Heights.

Zip codes  75214 75218  75228

Northeast Dallas

The Northeast Dallas area has many diverse and popular neighborhoods just minutes North and East of Dallas’ downtown.  It includes neighborhoods like Abrams, Belmont, Belmont Addition, Bryan Place, Caruth Terrace, Casa Linda, Casa Linda Estates, Cochran Heights, Forest Hills, Greenland Hills, Hillside, Hollywood Heights, Hollywood Santa Monica, Junius Heights, Lake Park Estates, Lakewood, Lakewood Heights, Lakewood Hills, Lakewood Trails, Little Forest Hills, Lochwood, Lower Greenville, M Streets, Munger Place, Old East Dallas, Old Lake Highlands, Ridgewood Park, Santa Monica, Swiss Avenue, University Meadows, University Terrace, Vickery Meadows, Vickery Place and Wilshire Heights.

Zip codes: 75204 75206  75214 75218  75223 75226 75228 75246 ASR</font>

Lake Highlands

The Lake Highlands area of Dallas includes over 15 popular neighborhoods like: Alexander’s Village, Highland Meadows, L Streets, Lake Highlands, Lake Highlands North, Lake Ridge Estates, Merriman Park North, Merriman Park/ University Manor, Moss Farm, Moss Meadows, Oak Highlands, Royal Highlands, Town Creek, Urban Reserve, Vickery Meadows, White Rock, White Rock Valley and Woodlands on the Creek.

Zip codes : 75231 75238 75243

Forest Hills/Little Forest Hills

The Forest Hills/Little Forest Hills area includes beautifully treed neighborhoods located on the southern end of White Rock Lake and the Dallas Arboretum: Casa Linda, Casa Linda Estates, Forest Hills, Lake Park Estates, and Little Forest Hills.

Zip code: 75218

 

Electronic waste describes discarded electrical or electronic devices. The used electronics which are destined for reuse, resale, salvage, recycling or disposal are also considered as e-waste. Informal processing of electronic waste in developing countries may cause serious health and pollution problems, though these countries are also most likely to reuse and repair electronics.

All electronic scrap components, such as CRTs, may contain contaminants such as lead, cadmium, beryllium, or brominated flame retardants. Even in developed countries recycling and disposal of e-waste may involve significant risk to workers and communities and great care must be taken to avoid unsafe exposure in recycling operations and leaking of materials such as heavy metals from landfills and incinerator ashes. Scrap industry and U.S. EPA officials agree that materials should be managed with caution

Today the electronic waste recycling business is in all areas of the developed world a large and rapidly consolidating business. People tend to forget that properly disposing of or reusing electronics can help prevent health problems, create jobs, and reduce greenhouse-gas emissions. Part of this evolution has involved greater diversion of electronic waste from energy-intensive downcycling processes (e.g., conventional recycling), where equipment is reverted to a raw material form. This recycling is done by sorting, dismantling, and recovery of valuable materials. This diversion is achieved through reuse and refurbishing. The environmental and social benefits of reuse include diminished demand for new products and virgin raw materials (with their own environmental issues); larger quantities of pure water and electricity for associated manufacturing; less packaging per unit; availability of technology to wider swaths of society due to greater affordability of products; and diminished use of landfills.

Audiovisual components, televisions, VCRs, stereo equipment, mobile phones, other handheld devices, and computer components contain valuable elements and substances suitable for reclamation, including lead, copper, and gold.

One of the major challenges is recycling the printed circuit boards from the electronic wastes. The circuit boards contain such precious metals as gold, silver, platinum, etc. and such base metals as copper, iron, aluminum, etc. One way e-waste is processed is by melting circuit boards, burning cable sheathing to recover copper wire and open- pit acid leaching for separating metals of value. Conventional method employed is mechanical shredding and separation but the recycling efficiency is low. Alternative methods such as cryogenic decomposition have been studied for printed circuit board recycling,[44] and some other methods are still under investigation.

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency encourages electronic recyclers to become certified by demonstrating to an accredited, independent third party auditor that they meet specific standards to safely recycle and manage electronics. This works to ensure the highest environmental standards are being maintained. Two certifications for electronic recyclers currently exist and are endorsed by the EPA. Customers are encouraged to choose certified electronics recyclers. Responsible electronics recycling reduces environmental and human health impacts, increases the use of reusable and refurbished equipment and reduces energy use while conserving limited resources. The two EPA-endorsed certification programs are: Responsible Recyclers Practices (R2) and E-Stewards. Certified companies ensure they are meeting strict environmental standards which maximize reuse and recycling, minimize exposure to human health or the environment, ensure safe management of materials and require destruction of all data used on electronics. Certified electronics recyclers have demonstrated through audits and other means that they continually meet specific high environmental standards and safely manage used electronics. Once certified, the recycler is held to the particular standard by continual oversight by the independent accredited certifying body. A certification accreditation board accredits certifying bodies and oversees certifying bodies to ensure that they meet specific responsibilities and are competent to audit and provide certification. EPA supports and will continue to push for continuous improvement of electronics recycling practices and standards.
e-Cycle, LLC: e-Cycle, LLC is the first mobile buyback and recycling company in the world to be e-Stewards, R2 and ISO 14001 certified. They work with the largest organizations in the world, including 16 of the Fortune 20 and 356 of the Fortune 500, to raise awareness on the global e-waste crisis.
Best Buy: Best Buy accepts electronic items for recycling, even if they were not purchased at Best Buy. For a full list of acceptable items and locations, visit Best Buy’s Recycling information page.
Staples: Staples also accepts electronic items for recycling at no additional cost. They also accept ink and printer toner cartridges. For a full list of acceptable items and locations, visit the Staples Recycling information page.
In the US, the Consumer Electronics Association (CEA) urges consumers to dispose properly of end-of-life electronics through its recycling locator at www.GreenerGadgets.org. This list only includes manufacturer and retailer programs that use the strictest standards and third-party certified recycling locations, to provide consumers assurance that their products will be recycled safely and responsibly. CEA research has found that 58 percent of consumers know where to take their end-of-life electronics, and the electronics industry would very much like to see that level of awareness increase. Consumer electronics manufacturers and retailers sponsor or operate more than 5,000 recycling locations nationwide and have vowed to recycle one billion pounds annually by 2016,[49] a sharp increase from 300 million pounds industry recycled in 2010.
The Sustainable Materials Management Electronic Challenge was created by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Participants of the Challenge are manufacturers of electronics and electronic retailers. These companies collect end-of-life (EOL) electronics at various locations and send them to a certified, third-party recycler. Program participants are then able publicly promote and report 100% responsible recycling for their companies.
AddressTheMess.com is a Comedy Central pro-social campaign that seeks to increase awareness of the dangers of electronic waste and to encourage recycling. Partners in the effort include Earth911.com, ECOInternational.com, and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Many Comedy Central viewers are early adopters of new electronics, and produce a commensurate amount of waste that can be directed towards recycling efforts. The station is also taking steps to reduce its own environmental impact, in partnership with NativeEnergy.com, a company that specializes in renewable energy and carbon offsets.
The Electronics TakeBack Coalition is a campaign aimed at protecting human health and limiting environmental effects where electronics are being produced, used, and discarded. The ETBC aims to place responsibility for disposal of technology products on electronic manufacturers and brand owners, primarily through community promotions and legal enforcement initiatives. It provides recommendations for consumer recycling and a list of recyclers judged environmentally responsible.
The Certified Electronics Recycler program[53] for electronic recyclers is a comprehensive, integrated management system standard that incorporates key operational and continual improvement elements for quality, environmental and health and safety (QEH&S) performance.
The grassroots Silicon Valley Toxics Coalition (svtc.org) focuses on promoting human health and addresses environmental justice problems resulting from toxins in technologies.
Basel Action Network (BAN.org) is uniquely focused on addressing global environmental injustices as a result of the global toxic trade. It works for human rights and the environment by preventing disproportionate dumping of hazardous waste on developing countries, on a large scale. Today, BAN is not only the leading global source of information and advocacy on toxic trade and international hazardous waste treaties, but it has also developed market-based solutions that rely on the highest standards for globally responsible recycling and rigorous accredited and independent certification to those standards.
Texas Campaign for the Environment (texasenvironment.org) works to build grassroots support for e-waste recycling and uses community organizing to pressure electronics manufacturers and elected officials to enact producer takeback recycling policies and commit to responsible recycling programs.
The World Reuse, Repair, and Recycling Association (wr3a.org) is an organization dedicated to improving the quality of exported electronics, encouraging better recycling standards in importing countries, and improving practices through "Fair Trade" principles.
Take Back My TV is a project of The Electronics TakeBack Coalition and grades television manufacturers to find out which are responsible and which are not.
The e-Waste Association of South Africa (eWASA) has been instrumental in building a network of e-waste recyclers and refurbishers in the country. It continues to drive the sustainable, environmentally sound management of all e-waste in South Africa.
E-Cycling Central is a website from the Electronic Industry Alliance which allows you to search for electronic recycling programs in your state. It lists different recyclers by state to find reuse, recycle, or find donation programs across the country.[56]
Ewaste.guide.info is a Switzerland-based website dedicated to improving the e-waste situation in developing and transitioning countries. The site contains news, events, case studies, and more.
StEP: Solving the E-Waste Problem This website of StEP, an initiative founded by various UN organizations to develop strategies to solve the e-waste problem, follows its activities and programs

 

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